Plagiarism

It started when I read the first sentence of the introduction of D. P. L. and K. Surresh, “An optimized feature set for music genre classification based on Support Vector Machine“, in Proc. Recent Advances in Intelligent Computational Systems, Sep. 2011. They write:

Music is now so readily accessible in digital form that personal collections can easily exceed the practical limits on the time we have to listen to them: ten thousand music tracks on a personal music device have a total duration of approximately 30 days of continuous audio.

Then I googled “Music is now so readily accessible in digital form“, and look at this! The top first hit is from an article in press: Angelina Tzacheva, Dirk Schlingmann, Keith Bell, “Automatic Detection of Emotions with Music Files“, Int. J. Social Network Mining, in press 2012. I can’t read the entire article; but the first two sentences of the abstract are:

The amount of music files available on the Internet is constantly growing, as well as the access to recordings. Music is now so readily accessible in digital form that personal collections can easily exceed the practical limits of the time we have to listen to them.

The source of this text, however, is in the third search result: M. Casey, R. Veltkamp, M. Goto, M. Leman, C. Rhodes and M. Slaney, “Content-based Music Information Retrieval: Current Directions and Future Challenges“, Proc. IEEE, vol. 96, no. 4, pp. 668-696, Apr. 2008. The first sentence of their introduction is an exact match to the text in L. and Suresh:

Music is now so readily accessible in digital form that personal collections can easily exceed the practical limits on the time we have to listen to them: ten thousand music tracks on a personal music device have a total duration of approximately 30 days of continuous audio.

I don’t care to search for other examples of plagiarism in this publication, or that of Tzacheva et al. Even finding one lifted sentence in a work tells me how much time I should spend with it. Better for me to just write a blog post about it, and then send a complaint to IEEE.

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