“Two short pieces and an Interlude” in concert!

The “Partnerships” concert was a great success! The videos are slowly making their way to the YouTubes. Here Ensemble x.y do a fine job of my work, “Two short pieces and an Interlude”. (Programme notes below.)

I composed these three pieces from material generated by two versions of folk-rnn, each trained in a different way with the same traditional music data. I enjoy the challenge of transforming the material folk-rnn generates into music. Meeting this challenge involves composing contrapuntal subjects, contrasting melodies, harmonies and accompaniment, orchestration, and piecing together a form that results in entertaining music. My ultimate goal is to create pieces of music that I want to listen to repeatedly, and to do that I don’t shackle myself to “staying true” to what the computer model says. March to the Mainframe is an arrangement of tune “X:488”, appearing among the 3000 in “The folk-rnn Session Book Vol. 1 (of 10)”. My march features the complete 16-measure tune without any changes to the melody. I construct Interlude around a canon using the first four measures of “The Millennial Whoop Reel”, a piece I co-composed with folk-rnn last year. I was originally arranging this reel for the ensemble, but a little experiment with composing accompaniment led me to this little piece. Finally, The Humours of Time Pigeon comes from material generated by the folk-rnn system that also learned to generate titles. Though the generated transcription is essentially a failure of the system to create an Irish tune, the generated title was compelling enough that it inspired me to compose. I take far more liberty with the material than in the march. (I use the verbatim output for a movement in my tape composition, “Eight Short Outputs”.) The concluding measures of my piece feature a frenetic revisiting of material as a reference to the time-traveling pigeon meeting itself coming and going. I think it is very difficult to tell where I end and folk-rnn begins in any of these works I have composed – which I see as a reflection of successful collaboration – but I can always point out the bits from the computer.

 

Partnerships Concert Program

Here is the program for the upcoming concert, Partnerships.

Pieces for organ: The Glas Herry Comment & X:7153
by folk-rnn + Deep Bach (2017)
Richard Salmon organ
Traditional Irish Sets (with folk-rnn tunes in italics)
·      Jigs (The Cuil Aodha, The Dusty Windowsill, The Glas Herry Comment)
·      Slow Reels (Maghera Mountain, X:2897)
·      Fast Reels (The Rookery, X:1068, Toss The Feathers II)
Daren Banarsë
and Musicians
March to the Mainframe, Interlude, The Humours of Time Pigeon
by Bob L. Sturm + folk-rnn (2017)
Ensemble x.y
Ed SheerAI vs XenAkIs vs AIdele
by Nick Collins (2017)
Ensemble x.y
3 morphed pieces from “A Little Notebook for Anna Magdalena”
by J. S. Bach (1722) + MorpheuS (2017)
3 morphed pieces from “30 and 24 Pieces for Children”
by Kabalevsky (1937) + MorpheuS (2017)
Elaine Chew
piano
Safe Houses by Úna Monaghan + folk-rnn (2017)
The Choice
by Úna Monaghan (2015)
The Chinwag
by Úna Monaghan (2015)
Úna Monaghan
Irish harp, concertina, electronics
Pieces for organ: X:633 & The Drunken Pint
by folk-rnn + Deep Bach (2017)
Richard Salmon organ
Chicken Bits and Bits and Bobs
by Bob L. Sturm + folk-rnn (2017)
Ensemble x.y
Bastard Tunes
by Oded Ben-Tal + folk-rnn (2017)
Ensemble x.y

Preview of “The Humours of Time Pigeon”

The upcoming concert will see many new works, all of which have been composed by or co-composed with “musically intelligent” computers — whatever that means! One of these works is “The Humours of Time Pigeon”. Like “Chicken Bits and Bits and Bobs“, material for this piece comes from the 72,376 transcriptions generated by the first version of folk-rnn in 2015. Here’s the verbatim output of the system:

T: Humours Of Time Pigeon, The
M: 3/2
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
L:1/16
|:"D"D4 F4 "A"E2 DE|"D"F2 AA A2 FD "Em"E4|"D"d4 D4 F2 A2|"G"cded BA F2 E4:|
|:"D"f2 de "D"fdgf "A"e2 g2|"A7"fede "D"defg "A"a4|"Em"bgeg "D"fdef|"G"BBGB "A7"A2 A2|"Bm"ecde "D"f2 ed|"A"cBAB "A7"cdef|"A7"gfef "G"gfge|"A"eBcA "Em"B4:|
|:"D"fedf "D"f2e2|"D"agfe "D"d2 d2|"A"cedc "D"BAFA|"D7"ABAG FDDC|
"D"FEDF A2 A2|"D"BcdB "A"A2Ac|"G"BGBd "A"cdec|1"D"d2f2d2 d2:|2"D"d4 "D"d4|]

We can see some problems more clearly when we notate it:

humours.png

The transcription specifies a 3/2 meter, but it begins in 3/4. After two measures of the second phrase, it goes to 2/4 and stays there. Aside from the errors in counting, the tune does not look or sound like much of the training data. There are some good qualities though. For instance, it stays in D. It ends with a IV – V – I resolution. And THE TITLE.

I have actually worked with this transcription before. It appears without change in my composition, “Eight short outputs generated by a long short-term memory network with three fully connected hidden layers of 512 units each trained on over 23,000 ABC transcriptions of session music (Irish, English, etc.), and arranged by my own “personal” neural network trained on who knows what for who knows how long (I can’t remember any of the settings) (2015)“. The video below should start right on the piece.

I decided to revisit this transcription to compose a final movement after the March to the Mainframe and Interlude. I take more liberty with the material here than in Eight Short Outputs. I play with time throughout the piece, and try to bring alive the subject matter inspired by the title. The part with which I am especially happy is the ending. I have the instruments revisit material in a staggered fashion to animate the little Time Pigeon meeting itself coming and going in time.

Here is a synthesised version of “The Humours of Time Pigeon”. (It is MIDI, rendered by Sibelius, so has limited musical quality — especially with the slides in the violin; but it gives a good idea.)

Here is the score of all three movements.

Thanks folk-rnn!

MuMe 2017 Concert | Musical Metacreation

MuMe 2017 Concert

The Musical Metacreation Concert at the
Eighth International Conference on Computational Creativity,
Atlanta, Georgia
June 19 2017

Program

Maya Ackerman, James Morgan, Joshua Palkki, David Loker – Songs by ALYSIA, ROBOCCINI, and MABLE
Paul Bodily, Ben Bay, Dan Ventura – Best Song So Far
James Bradbury – Biomimicry
Shlomo Dubnov, Cheng-i Wang, Jaime Arias – Mumento
Arne Eigenfeldt – RezNoizBOTs
Michael Musick – Ecosystemic Improvisation System no. 3
Bob Sturm – The Ranston Cassock
Kivanç Tatar, Philippe Pasquier – Patar
Adam Wilson – Skronkbot II


There it is, The Ranston Cassock, on a concert program!

It will be taking a little bit of a new form, as I rewrite the part for viola.

Thanks folk-rnn!

The Musical Metacreation Concert at the Eighth International Conference on Computational Creativity, Atlanta, Georgia June 19 2017 Program Maya Ackerman, James Morgan, Joshua Palkki, David Loker &#…

Source: MuMe 2017 Concert | Musical Metacreation

Preview of “Interlude”

The upcoming concert will see many new works, most of which have been composed by or co-composed with “musically intelligent” computers. One of these works is “Interlude”, which I composed from The Millennial Whoop Reel. I was originally arranging this “reel” for the concert — as part of a “Millennial Whoop Cycle” — but a brief experiment in creating a canon sidetracked me to arriving at this short piece (coming after March to the Mainframe).

Here is a synthesised excerpt from the first half of “Interlude”. (It is MIDI, rendered by Sibelius, so has limited musical quality; but it gives a good idea.)

Essentially, the entire piece is built from the first few measures of the Millennial Whoop Reel. The snare appears, but this time it’s played with brushes (I envisioned a “baroque shuffle”). The piano provides a contrasting voice in the second half. It’s an odd 2-minute piece that I’m really happy with.

Here is the score of all three movements. Interlude is the second.

Thanks folk-rnn!

 

Preview of “March to the Mainframe”

The upcoming concert will see many new works, most of which have been composed by or co-composed with “musically intelligent” computers. One of these works is “March to the Mainframe”, which I composed from X:488 in The folk-rnn Session Book Volume 1 (of 10). This transcription was generated by our newest token-based system.

X:488 is a rather simple tune. Here is the verbatim output of the system:

M:6/8
K:Dmix
|A2D D2B|AGE c2A|GEE c2E|E2D DEG|
A2D D2B|AGE c2d|ecA GEA|D3 D3:|
Add Add|ede dcA|GEE cEE|GAB cBc|
Add Add|edc AGA|BcB AGE|D3 D3:|

Here it is in staff notation.

X488.png

Here is a MIDI harp rendition of the above tune:

This tune wasn’t too challenging for composition. Most of it makes sense already. In my arrangement, I tried to keep the harmonies simple and folksy, use some hemiolas to add momentum, and create a bit of counterpoint banter between the instruments without becoming too academic. There will be some synchronised foot stomping too.

Here is a synthesised excerpt from the first part the “March to the Mainframe”. (It is MIDI, rendered by Sibelius, so has limited musical quality; but it gives a good idea.)

Like “Chicken Bits and Bits and Bobs”, “March to the Mainframe” comes from a one-way process of composition with the “musically intelligent” computer. I discovered X:488 in Vol. 1, and while learning to play it myself dreamed up the march. I didn’t need to seek any further information from our system. The material was good enough, signed, sealed and delivered.

Here is the score of all three movements, the first of which is the march.

Thanks folk-rnn!